Flexibility Is Key When Developing Land-Use Plan

by BRAD WEIHRAUCH
January 2014

Last year we had a lot more calls from property owners who want new ways to use their land. Apparently, landowners are realizing a large-scale upswing in the building market is probably many years away. So they do budgets and projections and approach me— possibly with a plan in hand.

Unfortunately, land-use plans are often based on typical “how to” information that is ideal, instead of real. When it comes to well drilling, any deviation from your expectation can affect your irrigation strategy. And that’s critical to any crop.

Let’s face it. Not all wells perform the same. An eight-inch well on one parcel of land may pump a different amount of water than an eight-inch well nearby. Although an experienced well driller can give you a pretty good idea, that isn’t a guarantee.

So, if you want to make plans— go ahead. Do your budgets and projections. But be prepared to change them all, if need be, because of well water output. I caution you against ordering plants and trees, irrigation and other equipment until you know there’s enough water to do what you want to do. Many times we change the landowners’ plans after the well is dug.

If you’re going to drill a well, be sure to consult your water management district for proper permitting. Verify your well driller’s insurance and license beforehand.

BIO: Brad Weihrauch is a Polk County native. He grew up around a family business of agriculture and customer service. After Winter Haven High School, he went on to complete his education at Polk Community College and Warner Southern. After serving 17 years in customer service for a large retailer, Weihrauch returned to his agriculture roots and founded RWC, an agri-service and management company, in 2002.

Comments are closed.